Tuesday, July 8, 2014


YOGA MYTHS Myth 1: Yoga is a religion Yoga is a technology. Anybody who is willing to make use of it can make use of it. Myth 2: Yoga practice means you need to put your body into pretzel like positions. Most people only think of asanas when you say yoga . Many people have chosen to represent yoga with only the physical aspect. In the yogic system, there is very little significance given to asanas. For a little over two hundred Yoga Sutras, only one sutra is dedicated to asanas. With yoga practice, we want human beings to start their journey with the body but move towards their inner nature. The yogic system is a subtle manipulation of your system to allow it to rise to a different level. Yoga means that which allows you to attain to your higher nature. Every asana, every mudra, every way of breathing – everything – is focused towards this. Myth 3: Yoga is great exercise Yoga is not just exercise, because it has other dimensions attached to it. If hatha yoga is taught in a proper atmosphere, it is a fantastic process of shaping your system into a fabulous device to receive the Divine. Myth 4: Yoga should be done in front of a mirror and with music If you want to get the involvement of that which is the source of creation within you, your body, your mind, your energy must be absolutely involved. You should approach it with a certain reverence and certain focus. Myth 5: Need a yoga study guide? You can learn yoga from a book. Many people have caused immense damage to themselves by learning yoga through books. It seems to be very simple, but when you do it, you will see it is a very subtle aspect. This has to be done with perfect understanding and proper guidance. Without this, one can get into deep trouble. A book can inspire you, but it is not meant to teach a practice. Myth 6: Yoga is something you practice every day One must become yoga. If it’s morning-evening yoga, the rest of the time entanglement – this is not yoga, this is only yoga practice. There is no aspect of life which is excluded from the yogic process. If your life becomes yoga, then you can do everything. COME AND CHECK OUT YOGA WITH ANGIE OR ONE OF THE OTHER FITNESSRX YOGA TEACHERS. VISIT OUR SITE AT WWW.FITNESSRXONLINE.COM FIRST CLASS IS FREE 248 488 9830

Friday, April 4, 2014

Exercise is "the best preventive drug" for many common ailments

Exercise is "the best preventive drug" for many common ailments According to Jordan Metzl, a sports-medicine physician at New York City's Hospital for Special Surgery and author of The Exercise Cure: “Exercise is the best preventive drug we have, and everybody needs to take that medicine.” Exercise helps normalize your glucose, insulin, and leptin levels by optimizing your insulin/leptin receptor sensitivity. It also releases mood boosting brain chemicals that help combat depression . Another side effect of exercise include clearer complexion. To improve your skin, you’ll want to focus on resistance training. Excessive cardio can actually cause your skin to lose its youthful elasticity. Research shows that the “secret” to increased happiness is a long-term investment in regular exercise, and a little each day appears to go further than a lot once or twice a week. There’s plenty of research validating the use of exercise for the treatment of depression. In one study, aerobic exercise was found to be as effective as Zoloft.

Friday, March 14, 2014


YOGIC EATING Food is fuel for your body! Your body knows what it needs in order to keep running efficiently--it needs the fuel of vitamin and nutrient rich foods from a variety of food groups. That’s why it’s important to listen to your body and respond to its natural hunger. It will tell you what it needs. And if you don’t listen, it will find ways to keep reminding you--like headaches, a growling stomach, and obsessing about food. The FIRST key to listening to your body is being able to detect when you are getting hungry. If you are indeed truly hungry, and not just looking for food to cure your boredom, stress, or loneliness, then it is time to refuel. The SECOND key is being able to know when you have had enough. Listen to your body. When you begin to feel full, you will know that you have had enough to eat. The goal is to feel content--not uncomfortably stuffed but not starving either. For some people this means planning 5 or 6 smaller, well-balanced meals a day instead of 3 large meals. And remember, it takes about 20 minutes for your body to realize it’s full. Also, be aware of what you are eating—eat sitting down, chew slowly, enjoy the tastes, smells, and textures of your food. The THIRD key is moderation, nothing to extremes. Often people hear this advice and think it means they can eat whatever they crave, all the time. Obviously we cannot survive on potato chips or peanut butter cookies alone. And if you tried, chances are you’d probably start to crave some pasta or fresh fruit after awhile. These cravings are your body’s way of helping you get the nutrients it knows you need. Eat what you want, when you are truly hungry. Stop when you’re full. And eat exactly what appeals to you. Do this instead of any diet, and you’re likely to maintain a healthy weight and avoid eating disorders. Listen To Your Body